OpenHouseTool

Open House? | Our App Helps

Our Pacific Coast Agent 3.0 app ( Lite & *Pro ) is the ultimate tool for helping
you educate potential buyers during your open house.

Here are a few things you can do:

Generate Estimates

Easily generate a buyers estimate that includes payment information, closing cost information, property pictures, your info & more.

Marketing Material

Choose from a plethora of marketing pieces which can be customized. Need a flyer about the benefits of buying? Our app has you covered.

Capture Info

Buyer estimates, marketing pieces, and seller netsheets can be sent via email or text
message. This allows you to capture your prospective buyers contact info.

Our Pacific Coast Agent 3.0 is available for you Iphone, Android, PC, or Mac.

* The pro version includes the marketing center. The pro
version must be purchased.

PerfectFarmPackage

Ordering Your Perfect Farm

HOW TO ORDER YOUR PERFECT FARM PACKAGE

Ready to start farming? If you are having trouble finding a way to get started don’t worry, we have your back.  We have created this handy 4-step guide to help you order your  perfect farm package.

Location

Location is the starting point for all real estate farming efforts. Below are a few popular choices that many agents use when selecting a location.

  • City
  • Zipcode
  • Tract
  • Radius

Property Type

Property type is the second most important piece needed. Below you will find some of the most common property types agents target.

  • Single Family Residences
  • Units 2-4
  • Apartments
  • Condos

ADDITIONAL CRITERIA

Additional criteria is what can help you drill down and get the best results. Below you will find additional search criteria that agents use.

  • Sale Date Range
  • Surnames
  • Property Characteristics i.e (Beds, Baths, Sqft.)
  • Owner or Non-Owner Occupied

DELIVERY METHOD

Now that we have decided on all of your other factors the final step is delivery. It can be one
or a combination of the options below:

Electronic

  • CSV
  • PDF
  • Both

Hard Copy

  • 6 Line Booklet
  • 5160 Mailing Labels
insuringlivingtrust

Insuring a Trust? This will help.

In today’s world of busy probate courts and exorbitant death taxes, the living trust has become a common manner of holding title to real property. The following may help you understand a few of the requirements of the title insurance industry if title to property is conveyed to the trustee of a living trust.

What Is A Trust?
An agreement between a trustor and trustee for the trustee to hold title to and administer designated assets of the trustor for the use and benefit of one or more beneficiaries.

Can A Trust Itself Acquire And Convey Interest In Real Property?
No. The trust is an arrangement between a trustee and the trustor only. The trustee, on behalf of the trust, may own and convey any interest in real property so long as the trustee acts within the powers granted by the trust to the trustee.

Can The Trustee Give Someone A Power-Of-Attorney?
Only if the trust specially provides for the appointment of an attorney in fact.

What Will The Title Company Require If A Trustee Holds The Title To The Property              Which Is Part Of The Trust?
First, a full copy of the trust and any amendments. Second, a certification that the copy of the trust and amendments (if any) are complete and true copies, and the names of the present trustees of the trust.
My Trust Contains A Certain Amount Of Money To Be Given To Various Charities Which Is None Of Your Business.

Can I Omit These Pages?
Because many provisions may be on the same page, the answer must be no – but the companies may accept a copy of the trust with those amounts blacked out.

If There Is More Than One Trustee, Can Just One Sign?
Maybe. The trust must specifically provide for less than all to sign.

What Will The Title Company Require If All The Trustees Have Died Or                                Are Unwilling To Act?
If the trustor is not able to, or the trust provisions prohibit the trustor from appointing a new trustee, the court must do so.

Who Can Be A Trustee?
Any individual not under a legal disability or a corporation that has qualified to do a trust business in
California.

How Does A Notary Acknowledge The Signature Of The Trustee?
Title is vested in the trustee. Hence, if the trustee is an individual or corporation, then the new general form of acknowledgement will be prepared to reflect the intrinsic nature of the trustee.

How Would The Deed To The Trustee Ordinarily Be Worded To Transfer Title To The
Trustee?
“John Doe and Mary Doe, as trustees of the Doe family trust, under declaration of trust deed dated January 1, 1992.”

Are There Any Limitations On What A Trustee May Do?
Yes, the trustee is limited principally and most importantly by the provisions of the trust and, thus, may only act within the terms of the trust. The probate code contains general powers which, unless limited by the trust agreement, are sufficient for title insurers to rely on for sale, conveyance and refinance purposes.

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Understanding Mechanics Liens

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California Mechanics’ Lien law provides special protection to contractors, subcontractors, laborers and suppliers who furnish labor or materials to repair, remodel or build your home. If any of these people are not paid for the services or materials they have provided, your home may be subject to a mechanics’ lien and eventual sale in a legal proceeding to enforce the lien. This result can occur even where full payment for the work of improvement has been made by the homeowner.

The mechanics’ lien is a right that California gives to workers and suppliers to record a lien to ensure payment. This lien may be recorded where the property owner has paid the contractor in full and the contractor then fails to pay the subcontractors, suppliers, or laborers. Thus, in the worst case, a homeowner may actually end up paying twice for the same work.

Why, you may ask, can a homeowner be placed in the impossible situation of having to pay twice for the same work? The answer lies in the Constitution and laws of California. The overriding theory behind the mechanics’ lien law is that between two potentially blameless parties, the homeowner who has ordered the work and made full payment of the agreed amount and obtained the value of the work is in a better position to bear the loss than the laborer or supplier who has provided work or materials to the job site and has not been paid for his efforts by the contractor. It is the homeowner who bears the ultimate responsibility for making payment for services rendered. The theory is that the value of the property upon which the labor or materials have been bestowed has been increased by virtue of these efforts and the homeowner who has reaped this benefit is required in return to act as the ultimate guarantor of full payment to the persons responsible for this increase in value. In practice, a homeowner faced with a valid mechanics’ lien may be compelled to pay the lien claimant and then pursue conventional legal remedies against the contractor or subcontractor who initially failed to pay the lien claimant but who himself was paid by the homeowner. Another justification for this result relates to the relative financial strengths of the parties to a work of improvement. The law views the property owner as being in a better situation to absorb the financial setback occasioned by having to pay the amount of a valid mechanics’ lien, as opposed to a laborer or material man who is viewed as being less able to absorb the financial burdens occasioned by not being paid for services or materials provided in connection with a work of improvement.

The best protection against these claims is for the homeowner to employ reputable firms with sufficient experience and capital and/or require completion and payment bonding of the construction work. The issuance of checks payable

jointly to the contractor, material men and suppliers is another protective measure, as is the careful disbursement of funds in phases based upon the percentage of completion of the project at a given point in the construction process. The protection offered by mechanics’ lien releases can also be helpful.

Even if a mechanics’ lien is recorded against your property you may be able to resolve the problem without further payment to the lien claimant. This possibility exists where the proper procedure for establishing the lien was not followed. While it is true that mechanics’ liens may be recorded by persons who have provided labor, services, or materials to a job site, each is required to strictly adhere to a well-established procedure in order to create a valid mechanics’ lien.

Needless to say, this is one area of the law that is very complex, thus it may be worthwhile to consult an attorney if you become aware that a mechanics lien has been recorded against your property. In the event you discover that a lien has been recorded but no effort has been made to enforce the lien, a title company may decide to ignore the lien. However, be prepared to be presented with a positive plan to eliminate the title problems created by this type of lien. This may be accomplished by means of a recorded mechanics’ lien release from the person who created the lien, or other measures acceptable to the title company.

As in all areas of the real estate field, the best advice is to investigate the quality, integrity, and business reputation of the firm with whom you are dealing. Once you are satisfied you are dealing with a reputable company and before you begin your construction project, discuss your concerns about possible mechanics’ lien problems and work out, in advance, a method of ensuring that they will not occur.

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10 Tips for a smooth closing…

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  1. Make sure the Purchase and Sale Agreement is fully executed with names, marital status of all parties, addresses and contact phone numbers. Also, make sure the Purchase and Sale Agreement is legible since this is Escrow’s main source of information.
  2. Is there a Power of Attorney needed? If so, make sure the client has the original or it has been recorded. Have Escrow or Title review it as soon as possible to confirm form, dates and notary are correct.
  3. Are the buyers or sellers out of state? Let the Closer know early to allow adequate time for delivery of documents.
  4. Are the buyers or sellers out of the country? If so, the client must have the documents notarized at an American Consulate or Embassy.
  5. If any divorces, deaths or trusts appear on title, we will need copies of divorce decrees, death certificates or trust agreements (not necessarily available through public record).
  6. Are utilities addressed on the Purchase and Sale Agreement? Is the addendum attached? Make certain your Closer has a list of the utilities that need to be paid.
  7. If the property is a condominium or PUD, please furnish Escrow with the name and address of the Homeowner’s Association.
  8. Are there any specific or special needs of your buyer or seller? The Escrow Officer can help you with schedules, physical limitations or other needs.
  9. Is the buyer receiving a home-buyer’s warranty? If so, let the Closer know who is ordering it and who is paying for it.
  10. Did you specify Pacific Coast Title Company for the Title Order?
handpuzzle

Lost Note & Missing Beneficiary

Man any of you probably know that you can do “the bond thing” if the preliminary report discloses an old deed of trust, and the seller tells you, “I paid this off many moons ago, but I do not have any of the original documents and the beneficiary cannot be reached. He was last seen ascending the Himalayas with the Dalai Lama long ago. I’m sure he’s drifted into the great void by now.” But do you really know about the ramifications of “the bond thing”?

In situations where both the beneficiary and the original note are missing, “the bond thing” is a multi-step process wherein obtaining the bond is just the first step. (See California Civil Code Section 2941.7)

To obtain a bond an insurance agent must be contacted, who in turn will work with a surety company that issues Lost Note Bonds. The insurance agent will request that the applicant/seller provide copies of the note (if available) and copies of documentation that evidences payment of the note, such as cancelled checks, payment books, etc. Additionally, the applicant/seller will be asked to sign an indemnity agreement in favor of the surety company issuing the bond. Occasionally, (typically when the bond is for a substantial amount of money), the insurance agent will request a financial statement from the applicant. Standard practices charged by bonding companies would be a premium paid for the bond ranging from 1.5 to 2%, double the original principal obligation of the deed of trust (the original principal will be increased to include any additional advance amounts disclosed by the official records).

 

The minimum requirements for all bonds are:

1. The bond shall be the greater of either (A) two times the amount of the original obligation secured by the mortgage and deed of trust and any additional principal amounts, including advances, shown in any recorded amendment thereto, or (B) one-half of the total amount computed pursuant to (A) and any accrued interest on such amount, and shall be conditioned for payment of any sum which the mortgagee or beneficiary may recover in an action on the obligation secured by the mortgage or deed of trust, with costs or of litigation and reasonable attorney’s fees.

2. The obligee named in the bond can be:
a) The mortgagee or mortgagee’s successor in interest
b)The trustee who executes a reconveyance and the beneficiary or beneficiary’s successor in interest
Once the bond is in hand, is the deal all set to go? Can a reconveyance be obtained from the trustee? Unfortunately, the battle has just begun. Section 2941.7 sets forth that the bond and a declaration must be of record for at least 30 days before the trustee may issue the reconveyance. It is important to note that “prior” to the recording of the declaration, the code section requires that a notice of recording of declaration and bond be mailed by certified mail, return receipt requested to the last known address of the person to whom payments under the mortgage or deed of trust were made and to the last mortgagee or beneficiary of record at the address for such obligation shown on the instrument.

Lastly, it is recommended that the title officer, together with the owners, initiate personal contact with the trustee, who will be the person tasked with the job of reviewing the bond and declaration and who will ultimately be the one issuing the desired reconveyance. If the title officer and owners establish early contact with the trustee, the trustee will be in a position to review early drafts of the bond and declaration and thus provide the owner with helpful input. Such input will enhance the likelihood that the bond and declaration that was initially forwarded to them will be acceptable. Just as important, if the title officer has developed a rapport with the trustee, it is very likely that the trustee will deliver the reconveyance back to the owners in a very timely manner. Working together to solve title issues is how Pacific Coast Title Officers rise above the competition.

solar-panels

Solar Panel Agreement Transfers

While residential solar panel installations have increased more than 50% each year since 2012 nationwide, disputes over solar panel leases have simultaneously increased during the transfer of properties. Ensure your successful closing by considering these helpful tips and considerations for transactions involving solar panel lease agreements:

Be proactive:

Preopen your escrow with Pacific Coast Title Company and use the time early in the listing or prelisting period to be sure you completely understand the terms of the agreement as it applies to the transfer of the lease. It is better to be prepared and informed ahead of time before going into contract with a potential buyer.

Check the Records:

Ensure that any solar easements have been officially recorded in public records so that it is available to be noted during the title search process. Such an omission can potentially create issues for future buyers.

Know your options:

transfer well before the close of escrow (or before the official listing) to further help ensure a smooth process of the sale.

Communication is key:

Ensure that your escrow officer is informed. The more information you can offer, the better is to a smooth transaction. Make sure you alert your escrow team to your current lease agreement, status of the agreement and requirements from the leaseholder.

Keep your solar panel leaseholder involved:

Many companies have designated specialists available and assigned to assisting buyers and sellers through the lease transfer process.

Uninsured Deeds: What you should know

Have an Uninsured Deed?

Here is what you should know.

Most common problems from Uninsured Deed’s come from Quitclaim deeds between family members, especially
husband and wife. When a person is added to title, it is a window of opportunity for matters against him/her to attach
to the property.

You should be concerned when taking a listing…

• Is it a divorce situation?
• Was it signed in distress?
• Possible bankruptcy?
• Possibly a Forgery Deed

How can you spot an uninsured deed when you order a profile from Pacific Coast Title? Here are some red flags for your reference.

uninsureddeeds